RPMH plans event for National Wear Red Day

January 29, 2011

RPMH plans event for National Wear Red Day

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer among women in the United States, yet too few realize this fact and take prevention measures. Rolling Plains Memorial Hospital hopes to change this with the Red Dress Day event on Feb. 4 in the hospital’s main lobby.
The event will include free screenings for both men and women from 9-11 a.m. offering cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose checks. Heart healthy snacks and refreshments will also be served and hospital staff and volunteers will be on-hand to help answer questions.
“Red Dress Day is about raising awareness among women in our community who are at risk for heart disease,” said Donna Boatright, CEO of Rolling Plains Memorial. “It is our hope that the event will encourage smarter decisions in our everyday activities—whether it be through diet or exercise. Even a modest change can have huge results.”
Cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, are the nation’s number one killer, according to the American Heart Association. Approximately 64 million Americans become victims to one or several forms of cardiovascular disease, including congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, stroke or high blood pressure.
Every minute, an American dies of coronary heart disease. Cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, are the nation’s number one killer, according to the American Heart Association. Approximately 64 million Americans become victims to one or several forms of cardiovascular disease, including congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, stroke or high blood pressure.
“Warning signs and preventive measures are important to avert an abrupt coronary complication in the future,” said Rosa Best, chief nursing officer at Rolling Plains Memorial. “Once you realize that you, like so many others, are not untouchable, you discover that it’s never too early to begin to take responsibility for your own health.”
According to Best, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking and lack of regular exercise are all deadly elements that can contribute to complications of the heart.
If you or a family member fall into one of these groups, or if your family has a medical history of cardiovascular complications, Best urges you to talk with your physician about the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
“A thorough physical exam of your weight, blood pressure and cardiovascular fitness can help identify possible complications,” said Best. “A physician can advise whether you might benefit from an electrocardiogram, a test that allows physicians to take a closer look at your heart.”
If you are found to be at high risk for heart disease, your doctor can supply you with the tools needed to fight back. Prescribed medication, a medically-directed diet and an exercise program are the usual options prescribed to improve your health.
Those who are physically active are twice as likely to prevent a heart attack. In addition, excess weight also increases the likelihood of heart related illnesses. According to the American Heart Association, exercise is beneficial in the long run as it decreases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other medical related illnesses.
Physical activity can improve the condition of your heart and lungs. Exercise routines should be brisk enough to raise your heart and breathing rates, sustained for at least 30 minutes without interruption and repeated at least three to five times per week.
At-risk individuals should also adopt a diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables as they have been linked to lowering risks of heart disease. In addition, up to 30 grams of fiber should be consumed every day. Because high blood pressure is linked to sodium intake, the amount of salt in your meals should be heavily limited.
“Foods rich with cholesterol are a major contributor to clogged arteries, which can cause a heart attack,” explained Best. “Exercise and eating a healthy mix of foods is your best way to prevent cardiovascular problems.”
Diets should be incorporated into a new lifestyle, along with exercise, to increase your overall health. As with any change of lifestyle, you are encouraged to consult with your physician to make sure your body can handle the prospective changes.
The Red Dress Day event is open to both men and women and will be held on Feb. 4, 2011, from 9-11 a.m. at Rolling Plains Memorial Hospital (200 E. Arizona Ave.). For more information, please contact the hospital at 325-235-1701.

About Rolling Plains Memorial Hospital
Rolling Plains Memorial Hospital provides healthcare for those in the communities they serve. Founded in 1976, Rolling Plains Memorial Hospital offers a wealth of medical services including: 24 hour emergency care, advanced radiology services including CT scanning and MRIs, outpatient lab, physical therapy, surgical services, swing bed services, patient education, and more.

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